Podcast: 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year B

This weekend we celebrate the 22nd Sunday of Ordinary Time, cycle B. I love that the theme for today is centered around being true disciples of Christ in our lives, and not just following a set of rules.

The Psalm for today, from chapter 15, says:

“The one who does justice will live in the presence of the LORD.”

As we continue to explore the theme of living justly in the presence of the Lord, and the need to allow our hearts to be guided by the author of truth, I find the Gospel acclamation fitting. Taken from James chapter 1, verse 18, it reads:

“The Father willed to give us birth by the word of truth
that we may be a kind of firstfruits of his creatures.”

The Communion Antiphon for today, taken from Psalm chapter 31, verse 20, has a different approach to the same theme – that God has good things planned for those who fear and revere the Lord:

“How great is the goodness, Lord,
that you keep for those who fear you.”


Featured Songs





Podcast Transcript

Hi and welcome to the Modern Psalmist Podcast. I’m Rebecca De La Torre.

This weekend we celebrate the 22nd Sunday of Ordinary Time, cycle B. I love that the theme for today is centered around being true disciples of Christ in our lives, and not just following a set of rules.

The Psalm for today, from chapter 15, says:

“The one who does justice will live in the presence of the LORD.”

The verses go on to describe the just man. I love that the first verse of this sung version of the psalm describes the just person as someone “who thinks the truth in his heart”
This is describing someone who doesn’t just follow the ten commandments *outwardly* but who *thinks* on the truth. The Lord who gives us this truth is the one we must allow to shape our hearts and thoughts. Only then can we be made worthy to live in his presence.

Psalm 15: The Presence of the Lord

That was my composition of “Psalm 15: The Presence of the Lord” for this 22nd Sunday of Ordinary Time, cycle B.

As we continue to explore the theme of living justly in the presence of the Lord, and the need to allow our hearts to be guided by the author of truth, I find the Gospel acclamation fitting. Taken from James chapter 1, verse 18, it reads:

“The Father willed to give us birth by the word of truth
that we may be a kind of firstfruits of his creatures.”

Alleluia (Mass of Mourning) 18th – 23rd OT B

The Communion Antiphon for today, taken from Psalm chapter 31, verse 20, has a different approach to the same theme – that God has good things planned for those who fear and revere the Lord:

“How great is the goodness, Lord,
that you keep for those who fear you.”

Communion Antiphon – 22nd OT

I love that the gospel for today from Mark chapter 7 emphasizes how the Pharisees focused on all the rules and laws rather than the heart and spirit behind the law. Jesus calls them out on this by quoting the prophet Isaiah, as it is documented in verses 6 & 7:

“This people honors me with their lips,
but their hearts are far from me;
in vain do they worship me,
teaching as doctrines human precepts.
You disregard God’s commandment but cling to human tradition”

This makes me wonder…. how often am I guilty of this myself? I sure like to think that I’m not like the Pharisees, but I know I’m a sinner, and being smug and looking at who I would judge as the “Pharisees” of today thinking that I’m *not* like them… am I fooling myself?

What if I put my own name there instead?

“Rebecca honors me with her lips,
but her heart is far from me”

Wow… that’s hard to read.

But this is why St James tells us in the second reading for today from chapter 1, verses 21 & 22 to:

“Humbly welcome the word that has been planted in you
and is able to save your souls.
Be doers of the word and not hearers only, deluding yourselves.”

This Christian way of life ain’t no joke. It’s a lot of work and it’s hard. I think I’ve got my act together and then I find out I’m only “deluding” myself.

But this is the journey that we are on. This is the road less traveled.

A song that I remember from my childhood growing up in the Southern Baptist tradition in the Deep South in Alabama, is “Take My Life and Let It Be” by Frances Ridley Havergal.

The words are such a perfect fit for the theme and message in today’s readings.

Take My Life and Let It Be

That was my interpretation of the traditional hymn, “Take My Life and Let It Be” by Frances Ridley Havergal, for the 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time, year B.

Links to all the recordings and sheet music from today’s episode can be found in the show notes, or on TheModernPsalmist.com.

Remember to pray with these songs and ask the Lord to change your life and heart according to his perfect will.

Until next week, may God bless you abundantly.