Podcast: 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C

This weekend we celebrate the 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time, cycle C. The readings for today encourage us to continually hope in the Lord be attentive to God’s voice, so we can serve him faithfully and do his will.

The psalm for today, taken from chapter 95, reminds us to continually listen for God’s voice, and to be open and surrendered to his commands:

“If today you hear his voice, harden not your hearts.”

As it often does, this communion antiphon for today follows the psalm very well, for those who keep their hearts open to God are rewarded by God’s goodness.

Taken from Lamentations chapter 3, verse 25, we read:

“The Lord is good to those who hope in him,
to the soul that seeks him.”

Featured Songs:

“Psalm 95: If Today” (Rebecca De La Torre)
https://themodernpsalmist.com/songs/psalm-95-if-today/

Communion Antiphon: Lamentations 3:25 (Rebecca De La Torre)
https://themodernpsalmist.com/songs/communion-antiphon-27th-ot/

I Surrender (Doug Slater)
https://themodernpsalmist.com/songs/i-surrender/


Featured Songs




Podcast Transcript

Hi and welcome to the Modern Psalmist Podcast. I’m Rebecca De La Torre.

This weekend we celebrate the 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time, cycle C. The readings for today encourage us to continually hope in the Lord be attentive to God’s voice, so we can serve him faithfully and do his will.

Beginning with the entrance antiphon from Esther chapter 4, verse 17, in the first part we read:

“Within your will, O Lord, all things are established,
and there is none that can resist your will.”

I like the expression that within God’s will, all things are *established* – this is, of course, because God is Love, and by his great love has creation been formed. God’s will is Love itself. Therefore, we are called to obey the will of perfect love.

And the psalm for today, taken from chapter 95, reminds us to continually listen for God’s voice, and to be open and surrendered to his commands:

“If today you hear his voice, harden not your hearts.”

The verses go on to praise the Lord, inviting us to sing to him and prostrate ourselves before the living God. Verse 6 specifically states:

“Come, let us bow down in worship;
let us kneel before the LORD who made us.”

The other verses encourage us to stay mindful of the ways in which God has blessed us, reminding us not to harden our hearts like many did in the time of Moses. But instead, to recall God’s works in our lives and to keep our hearts open and surrendered to his will.

As it often does, this communion antiphon for today follows the psalm very well, for those who keep their hearts open to God are rewarded by God’s goodness.

Taken from Lamentations chapter 3, verse 25, we read:

“The Lord is good to those who hope in him,
to the soul that seeks him.”

The gospel reading for today requires a little bit more exploration as Jesus teaches his disciples what attitude they should have as servants of the Lord. I have to admit that it is one of my least favorite of all time.

In verses 7-10 from Luke chapter 17, Jesus says to his disciples:

“Who among you would say to your servant
who has just come in from plowing or tending sheep in the field,
‘Come here immediately and take your place at table’?
Would he not rather say to him,
‘Prepare something for me to eat.
Put on your apron and wait on me while I eat and drink.
You may eat and drink when I am finished’?
Is he grateful to that servant because he did what was commanded?
So should it be with you.
When you have done all you have been commanded,
say, ‘We are unprofitable servants;
we have done what we were obliged to do.’”

Initially, this is hard for me to grasp, partially because I’ve never been a servant as illustrated in the context of this gospel reading. Perhaps the closest thing I’ve experienced is the way that I serve as the music director at my parish. Many music ministers call it a “thankless job” and in some ways I guess it can seem so. But for the most part I feel deeply appreciated and I have had many parishioners over the years express how thankful they are for my music at mass. As a matter of fact, if I *didn’t* feel appreciated, I’d probably want to go some place else where I *do* feel appreciated.

But Jesus tells us here in this gospel exactly what attitude we are to have when we serve in the Kingdom of God. I want to repeat verse 10 where he says:

“So should it be with you.
When you have done all you have been commanded,
say, ‘We are unprofitable servants;
we have done what we were obliged to do.’”

So what Jesus is telling us is that we really can’t make any claim on God’s graciousness. And even more so should we be grateful for when *are* blessed and feel appreciated for our work, rather than taking it for granted or even worse, feeling entitled.

To serve in this way that Jesus describes here in Luke chapter 17 requires a deep level of trust and surrender. And for me, I would say that surrender is the absolute hardest thing to do on this Christian journey. It’s something I have to be reminded of again and again, and daily surrender my will to the Almighty God, to Perfect Love.

My friend Doug Slater wrote a beautiful song titled “I Surrender” that I recorded several years ago and would like to share with you here.

That was my recording of Doug Slater’s song “I surrender” for the 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C. Check out the links in the show notes to find recordings and sheet music of all the songs featured on this podcast.

Please be sure to visit ThgeModernPsalmist.com for many more liturgical resources and songs.

Until next week, may God bless you abundantly.